Trump Says GOP Tax Plan Is Becoming 'More Popular.' Is He Right?

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Almost two-thirds of voters, meanwhile, said they believe the wealthy will be the biggest beneficiaries of the GOP tax plan, compared to about a quarter who said they think middle class Americans will see the largest benefit.

As the Senate version of the Republican tax reform bill made its way through the legislative process this past weekend, Gallup documented a highly partisan imbalance in Americans' reactions.

A Gallup poll found that 29% of people surveyed approved of the GOP tax bill, named the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act, while 56% disapproved.

A new Quinnipiac University Poll suggests that a Democratic wave is building in 2018, as voters overwhelmingly want Democrats in control of Congress. “Further, intensity seems to be on the side of the opposition, with Democrats paying closer attention to news about the tax proposals and appearing more unified in their opposition to the plan than Republicans are in support of it.”.

In a separate question, American voters say 61-to-34 percent that the tax plan favors the rich at the expense of the middle class.

Tuesday, President Trump had lunch with Senate Republicans at the White House to discuss the recently Senate-passed tax overhaul bill.

Though billed as a tax cut for all, or most, 41 percent said they think the plan will increase their taxes, 32 percent think it will be neutral and 20 percent said they expect tax cut.

Results for this Gallup poll are based on telephone interviews conducted December 1-2, 2017, on the Gallup U.S. Daily survey, with a random sample of 1,020 adults, aged 18 and older, living in all 50 U.S. states and the District of Columbia.

The same poll gave President Donald Trump an approval rating of 35 percent and a disapproval rating of 58 percent. "It's a fantastic bill for the middle class", Mr. Trump said.

Voters say 56-to-40 percent that Trump is not fit to be president, tying his all-time low score.

The House and Senate bills must now be reconciled in conference committee before Republicans' tax overhaul effort can be signed into law.

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