European Union sues Czech Republic, Hungary and Poland over low refugee intake

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The European Commission is to sue Poland, Hungary and the Czech Republic at the European Court of Justice (ECJ) for refusing to take in asylum seekers. The plan involved the relocation of 160,000 people.

The EU executive also announced on Thursday it would be escalating its attack on Hungary over measures taken to curb meddling in its domestic affairs by globalist billionaire George Soros.

The move was an attempt to relieve pressure on Greece and Italy where the vast majority of migrants were arriving. "Whereas all other Member States have relocated and pledged in the past months, Hungary has not taken any action at all since the relocation scheme started, Poland has not relocated anyone and not pledged since December 2015 [and] the Czech Republic has not relocated anyone since August 2016 and not made any new pledges for over a year".

The EU Commission launched infringement procedures against the three countries in June and twice demanded an explanation for the non-compliance.

On the account of Hungary already have one court case for the wrongful decision about the permission to get education in private institutions.

Czech Prime Minister Andrej Babis told the BBC he opposed the relocation plan and that it fueled anti-migrant sentiment in the country.

European Union nations agreed in September 2015 to relocate 160,000 refugees from Italy and Greece as the countries buckled under the arrival of hundreds of thousands of migrants that year.

The EC's deputy chair Frans Timmermans said a change of attitude on the part of these countries' governments could still resolve the situation out of court.

The organization has also chose to file a lawsuit in the European court of justice against Hungary adopted in this country, the laws on non-governmental organizations and higher education.

Prime Minister Viktor Orban attempted to pass a constitutional amendment in the National Assembly to block the quota, but failed.

The commission said Hungary's education law "disproportionally restricts European Union and non-EU universities in their operations and needs to be brought back in line with European Union law".

The commission said the laws "indirectly discriminate and disproportionately restrict donations from overseas to civil society organisations".

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