Atlanta mayor's race comes down to close call

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Because neither of them had the majority of the vote, under Atlanta's rules, the top two candidates then entered a runoff election, running a much tighter and more heated race than the general election, which saw a candidate field of 11 candidates.

Just 759 votes separated the candidates early Wednesday morning, Norwood told supporters.

"We can not call this yet", Norwood told supporters at Park Tavern in Midtown, indicating that absentee and provisional ballots were yet to be counted.

Atlanta has a new mayor-elect, and it's a Black woman for the second time in the city's history.

Many feel that the race was as close as it was because of Bottoms' endorsement by the current mayor, Kasim Reed, whose administration has been accused of corruption and bribery investigation and is allegedly being investigated by the Atlanta City Hall, diving the Black vote.

A victory for Bottoms, 47, would continue a run of African-American mayors that began with Maynard Jackson in the mid-1970s. Whatever their feelings, a win is a win!

"It's not over yet", Norwood said.

"I am just in awe of what God is able to do", Bottoms said.

Norwood has requested a recount in the latest contest because of the close margin.

A win for Norwood, 65, would give Atlanta its first-ever white female mayor, and end the Democratic Party's hold on an office it has held without interruption since 1879.

A half-century after white flight triggered sprawl that fueled legendary traffic jams, Atlanta is booming economically and growing at a breakneck pace, with townhouses and apartments going up all over town. Everyone seems to care about transportation, public safety and affordable housing.

"It's not over yet", Norwood said.

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