Texas State University Halts Greek Life After Fraternity Pledge Dies

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Texas State University has suspended all Greek life on campus after a student was found unresponsive the morning after attending a fraternity event, the university's president said in a statement.

Matthew McKinley Ellis, 20, was at an off-campus apartment complex called the Millennium, located at 1651 Post Road in San Marcos, when his friends noticed that he wasn't breathing about 11 a.m. Monday.

In a statement, Trauth sad she was "deeply saddened" by the student's death.

Ellis lived on campus, police said. It is too early to tell if Ellis died as a result of hazing, and it appears that the drinking was done at a private fraternity event, not in public, Kristy Stark, interim director of communications for the City of San Marcos, confirmed to ABC News.

Trauth added that she was suspending all Greek fraternity and sorority activities while the university completes a review of the Greek system. After the review, Joanne Smith, vice president for student affairs, will recommend which fraternities and sororities can be reinstated.

Flores said the University Police Department is assisting the San Marcos Police Department in the investigation and the fraternity will be reviewed.

Phi Kappa Psi members did not immediately respond to a request for comment sent through the fraternity's Facebook page on Tuesday afternoon.

The cause of Coffey's death is still undetermined, pending the autopsy, but police believe alcohol may have played a role in his death.

Monday, Penn State was back in the spotlight after Centre Country District Attorney Stacy Parks Miller announced charges against 12 new Beta Theta Pi brothers following the February death of pledge Timothy Piazza.

Matt Ellis is pictured on the Texas State University campus.

Phi Kappa Psi's Texas State chapter switched its Twitter account to private following Ellis' death, ABC San Antonio affiliate KSAT reported.

As a result of this tragedy, I have suspended activities of all Greek fraternity and sorority chapters at Texas State.

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