Gucci refuses fur in 2018

Share

"In selecting a new creative director I wanted to find someone who shared a belief in the importance of the same values", Bizzarri said.

Italian luxury brand Gucci is officially going fur-free, president and CEO Marco Bizzarri announced on Wednesday.

Models display creations as part of Gucci Fall-Winter 2011-2012 ready-to-wear collection on 23 February 2011 during the Women's fashion week in Milan.

The fashion house's remaining fur clothing will be sold in an auction with the money made donated to the animal rights organisation Humane Society International and LAV, an organisation that initiates legal actions to assert animal rights.

The move has been welcomed by organisations like Humane Society International (HSI), The Humane Society of the United States (HSAS), and LAV-members of the Fur Free Alliance (FFA), a coalition of more than 40 animal protection organisations working together to end the fur trade.

The fashion house is owned by luxury holding group Kering, which also has designer Stella McCartney as another fur-free brand under its umbrella.

Burberry was targeted by protesters during London Fashion Week over its continuing use of fur in its collections.

Its fur-free policy includes mink, coyote, raccoon, dog, fox, rabbit, and karakul (otherwise known as Swakara, Persian lamb or astrakhan) and all others species specially bred or caught for fur.

The brand now sells a wide selection of furs, perhaps most notably their Princetown fur-lined leather mules.

HSI's president, Kitty Block, branded the company's move as "compassionate". "For this Italian powerhouse to end the use of fur because of the cruelty involved will have a huge ripple effect throughout the world of fashion".

Apparently young people may have had something to do with Bizzarri's decisions to have Gucci go fur-free, since he claims to have recently "asked around 150 young people across the world to tell me three things wrong with Gucci".

Share