Stephen King's IT Brings in $51 Million for Opening Day

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It's been 27 years since the IT mini series and over 30 since the original novel penned by Stephen King was released.

Deadpool previously held the status of the top-grossing R-rated movie for Thursday night previews (it made $12.7 million for its Thursday night screenings). According to Warner Bros., it is also the largest opening for a horror movie ever. Following a dismal summer box office that plunged 14.6% from last summer to $3.8 billion, "It" serves in part as the pick-me-up the industry was desperately craving. Either way, the people have spoken, and they are super, super into getting scared senseless by the creepiest clown cinema has ever seen.

"It", starring Bill Skarsgard as a creepy clown who terrorizes children in a sleepy ME town, pulled in an estimated $117 million for the three-day weekend, website Exhibitor Relations reported.

Find out more about the It box office below.

Before this past weekend, "Paranormal Activity 3" had the biggest horror opening from 2011 with $52.6 million, and the highest September debut was "Hotel Transylvania 2's" $48.5 million in 2015.

It now holds an 87% score on Rotten Tomatoes, with an audience score of 89%. Warner Bros. expects an additional $62 million from overseas markets, shooting the total revenue near $180 million. The studio has got their money back and more. The R-rated horror film should make a whopping $117.2 million from 4,103 locations, far surpassing earlier expectations. It opened at number one with a record-breaking performance, which is now estimated at $117 million. "September will probably tell us where we are going to be at year end", said Jeff Bock, senior box office analyst at Exhibitor Relations Co. Hollywood movies have greatly benefitted in the past few weeks from the Middle Kingdom lifting its summer blackout period, which reserves theatrical releases for home-grown films, like the massive success "Wolf Warriors II".

Ultimately, credit has to go to director Andy Muschietti, screenwriters Chase Palmer, Cary Fukunaga, and Gary Dauberman, as well as the entire team behind the movie, in addition to the cast for so adeptly updating King's original tale.

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